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charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
, we need stem education, and, absolutely, i think we do, but we shouldn't underestimate this sense of practical skill that are often passed down from generation, the people of fire who actually are doing things on the factory floor that account for a lot of globe's most successful innovation when it comes to fire suits. one of the pieces, as i said, is that our democratic culture in the business world gives us this competitive advantage of o more authoritarian manufacturing structure, particularly small and medium sized businesses because that allows them to economize production, and that allows them to customize products. the second thesis in the book is tracing a support of manufacturing back in american history, and the idea there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing, ten pages, and me makes the argument. he says in a world where we are
with the organization. >> what are you going to be doing with them? >>i will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccolumn, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that somethi
was six-years old. he was a special education uden hisaren issd a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, the special education teacher, anne marie murphy. the teachers in that school, the principal, psychologist, the teachers that die protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those who survived, they are true heroes and they have not received the recognition, in my judgment, that they deserve. i point out that every one of them is a public-school teacher, a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> do wonderbout ts nes we are making about mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun violence in the district of columbia where people have been killed by firearms, prince george's county as well. are you suggesting to me that everyone who pulled a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, if you look at the virginia tech guide, and jared loughner, he was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic, which you could see
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
question, lots of answers. about 200 educators in utah are mulling that over today after attending classes on firearm use and safety. the course of geared toward teachers. instructors are not trying to persuade teachers to carry guns in schools, but to provide the information and training they need in the wake of the newtown massacre. the classes have been going on for some time and some teachers are sold on the idea of arming themselves. others simply want to explore their options. >> i think it's important to have protection because if you don't have it, i feel like we're sitting ducks. >> we're going to help them understand where their moral code and value system really is. until they discover that, they are not prepared to carry a firearm. >> utah already allows teachers to carry concealed weapons in schools. >>> for the second time this month, a man has been shoved to his death from a subway platform in new york city. it happened last night in queens. police and witnesses say a woman who had been pacing and mumbling pushed a man in front of the number 7 train before running down two f
prevention. we also believe parents need to be educating their kids and talking to kids about appropriate sexual behaviors to assure all of the young people in philadelphia are prepared when they think about having sex for the first time. we believe that our role is to assure that as partners for parents, we provide what young people may need if they're going to act responsibly in terms of sexual relations. >> you talk about education and i just want to throw out numbers. 25% of new hiv infections in philadelphia alone are teenagers. 15% of philadelphia students say they weren't taught about hiv or aids in school. some might argue maybe more education might be the answer, not condoms. >> we don't think it's one or the other. we think most are important. we're including education not only in schools but also include the internet and we're providing condoms as we've been doing now for more than a year in a number of locations throughout the city for young people. >> let's talk a little bit about the program. tell me a little bit about how it will work, because the part that i sort of took t
as did finding myself in this arena in having this incredible awakening and education. since i left the duke ellington school, i have often gone back to give master classes and work with young singers. my agency would often scheduled concert with master classes. again known in the industry has teaching younger -- i get known in the industry as teaching younger students. we have a number of to the -- we have a number of tickets we give away or offer at a discounted price. i remember when i was a student and saw my first opera. it was because the kennedy center and extended a certain amount of tickets for students to come. i realized there is a tremendous responsibility. it is also a pleasure to want to share this gorgeous art form with people and young people in particular. i know the impact and difference it made in my life have been known at 13 this is what i wanted to do. it gave me a direction and purpose. i never suffered under pressure of my desire to keep up with the latest. when i would go to a voice lesson or concert, there was no synthetic that could provide me with that ki
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has ground. n.ese are -- has grown a these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for its. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and yo
him to take on this mission, he had already had sort of a graduate level education if you will in howards are fought in the desert and that separated him in many ways from his four star contemporaries who were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to h
education, all that stuff. they don't care about that. they spend the money on what they want to get elected. >> when you're saying that the previous mayor spent all the money, you're talking about mayor daly. rahm emanuel is in place now. >> right. >> he spent all the money on what? and then, two, what is the realistic proposal here to reverse the violence? >> well, over 20 years i can give you a laundry list of corruption and cronyism. but you know it well because you were here as well. and you saw it. there was a reporter once for "time" doing a cnn profile, comparing richard daly to andy of maybury and said he presides over chicago like andy of maybury. now that reporter is the press secretary for president obama. so there had been -- not you, obviously, but there had been people who were papering over and smooching up and making things look nice when they weren't nice. the city is broke. we're a thousand police officers down, at least, right? and now the city is creating this news flap, public relations issue, saying there is now we're going to take one off the 500 and make it 499. you'
for months and years. i make plans for education in 2001 for the dutch government. i always follow something for inspiration. i saw last time that the democrats and republicans, the parties, they are working so good together to make something happen. host: you think the fiscal cliff debate is a good sign for the country? caller: absolutely, it is a good sign for the country. you know, america does not need money. america is money. america needs jobs. what kind of jobs? american jobs. what is on american jobs? to do the best and to bring the best things. that is the mayor, -- the america that i see. i seek some unity. i travel around the world. i see some the young americans everywhere. they become the best. host: from manitoba, canada, thank you so much for calling in. a few other stories we want to run through for you -- we will continue this discussion into the next segment. here is the story on federal workers getting a pay raise -- another story at what point you to, this from "the new york times" -- one other story i wanted to point out this morning, this from the new york daily news --
part-time or summer hire. we never did get into the education thing at all. we are focused on doing a job. my point on education is that there is something revolutionary that needs to happen. if you look now in the internet age and realize the rate at which a student downloads information -- the people who are really smart are bored. i think within maybe 20-25 years, you won't see a classroom typically like we do, where you see everybody goes to a classroom. it is for that reason, it is not a good thing to teach people who are going to be innovators later on. next question. >> thank you very much for your talk. what skills, academic, etc., do you need at early ages to facilitate creativity and innovation? how can parents and schools shape these attributes for kids? >> in answering that, i am going to focus on word that you said. you said cultivate. the point i have tried to make is that if things are going around in the world outside of the kid's community, outside of his local interface and outside of his school, if he sees wonderful progress happen, that is so different -- that is
that represents trustees and alumni once the department of education to investigate. they contend the southern association of schools commission overstepped its authority when it issued the warning. the warning was a response to the way that the university handled the firing of the president last summer. she was later reinstated. coming up, secretary of state hillary clinton is still in the hospital tonight. we will have an update on her condition. >> a d.c. school is the victim of a break-in for the third time in less than a month. >> there is a big change to the first nigh >> we are getting ready, it is already 2013 and other parts of the world. this is a scene from new zealand. in hong kong, tens of thousands of people gathered to watch another huge fireworks display. >> of course, at new york city is getting ready to usher in a new year. more than 1 million people are expected in times square to watch the traditional ball drop. the giant waterford crystal will be eliminated -- illuminated. security will be extra tight. it will be cold. the temperatures are expected to dip into the low 30's
that the department of energy or the department of education and the number of employees they have. we do not need all that. they can cut the number of employees in half and we would have real savings. nobody will address these issues. i'll hang up. guest: when you have a budget in washington, it is hard to cut back politically. if you do, people say you are against the were the goal. this worthy goal, that worthy goal. there was a british historian in the 1950's. after world war i, britain had the largest navy in the world and they reduced the size of the navy. the laid-off sailors and dock workers. the agency running the navy was getting bigger as the navy was getting smaller. he made the discovery -- the size of a bureaucracy has nothing to do with the amount of work the bureaucracy does. it will grow unless it is reined in. the bureaucracy was getting bigger. if you get that kind of bloat, get in trouble and you change or go out of business. ronald reagan said the closest thing to immortality is a government agency. caller: good morning, everybody. do you think capitalism and privatizing is withdr
check needs to pay for it. meantime, her it's already legal to carry a gun a record number of educators attended a training seminar earlier this week. >> we are teachers, all school employees for their application and permit to carry a firearm. in utah they have the advantage of beings able to carry one in schools. we do not restrict law abiding with a permit of carrying one in a school. >> hawaii, new hampshire and oregon allow them to carry one on campus. arizona and washington state looking into the proposal. it will face stiff resistance from gun control advocates including teachers that say guns have no place in schools. >> gregg: claudia in los angeles thanks. >> arthel: meanwhile, there is another controversial response to the recent shooting now having one new york state lawmaker fighting for the rights of gun owners. a local newspaper published a map on its website with the names and addresses of people in the area with pistol permits. now state senator gregg ball is speaking out against it. >>> to take the names of people obeying the lay and properly registered and treat them
but have a right to an education. >> i will get my education, if it is in home, school or any place. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today she is recovering in england. >>> number one, president barack obama. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> after a long, and we mean long, and bitter campaign president obama won re-election in 2012. the president also won the supreme court's stamp of approval for his health care reform program. and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with a community shocked by senseless violence. >> these tragedies must end. and to end them we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn atlanta. >>> that's 2012 in just 60 minutes. what does 2013 hold? we'll find out together. i'm don lemon, thanks for watching. i price rewind. because your daught
was astonishing. he was driven primarily by this incredible will that he had and thirst for education. he was embarrassed to did not finish college, so he finished law school instead. he went on and on. the idea of senator byrd as majority leader of the senate is quite remarkable. he came into the senate with the great class of 1958. they set the foundation for what i call the great senate that came later, the progressive senate. it was a democratic landslide that year. he was undeniably the most conservative of senators elected. philip hart, a whole -- whole flood of liberal senators and then there was robert byrd. it was not his youthful membership that was the issue. in later years, he remained against civil rights, which was essential thing the senate was about in the 1960s. he opposes civil rights act in 1964 and 1965. he opposed thurgood marshall when he was nominated. senator byrd was so conservative on some of these issues that in 1971,richard nixon toyed with putting him on the supreme court just to show the senate what he could do. senator byrd moderated his views all the time.
. what you have to realize, the more education you have, the lower your unemployment rate and the more likely you are to keep that job and to be making money. take advantage ever everything your employer offers to you. i had my entire mba and finance paid for by my employener my 20s. look for opportunities and take advantage of every one of them. it will mean money in the short run and scpreer life-changing alternatives for you in the long run. >> heather: this tip we can all do -- increase your permanent retirement savings. >> people get confused between temporary and permanent savings. i am talking the money comes in and never comes out. young people have it on your side. you have the power of compounding and time on your side. if you could put in that extra $1,000 a year, that's $20 a week, you know, in 10 years, it doesn't sound like much, if you earn 6%, it's only $13,000. but if you go 20, 30, 40 years out and you are getting into retirement, that $1,000, if you put in $40,000, it's now $154,000. and if you get the employer to match on top of that, you might have double that. ver
think local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> senator who says is he a quote strong supporter of second amendment rights maintains that the solutions to shootings like the one in connecticut will be found in families, faith, communities and in medicine. jamie? >> all right. we hope the solution is found. molly, thank you. well, for many 6 those families in newtown, connecticut, this is a heart-breaking christmas. can you imagine one without your loved ones if they died in that elementary school massacre? >> every single second that i think of newtown and i think of every parent who lost a child whether they celebrated christmas, hanukkah or anything else, i think of how do you get through christmas? what happens if that saturday was the day they were going to take them to santa. what happens if that was the day you sent them to see santa and that's the last picture you have? >> truly unimaginable. messages of love and hope have come in all over newtown. people donating toys and books clothing and money. a local official says all the donations and support have
%. education is only 4% of the budget, and it's the biggest thing. welfare doesn't even show up. it's in other. the question always for me is what is it that republicans want to cut, and isn't that the reason, and i'll go to jen on this, that they keep going at social security, which doesn't contribute to the deficit, but which is a big pot of money. >> the elections took over everything, and everything is debating until now, and they still can't get it done. the fact that there's no specifics on what they're willing to cut is a huge problem to getting anything here. >> who was against medicaid when it was passed and then expanded? republican party. they have never been for it. they have never been for it from the minute any of these programs were started? why were they started? because americans needed help. >> if the republicans and democrats want to be on the side of defense contractors and democrats want to be on the side of people, i guess that shows you the stark difference in realities between the two parties. i would rather stick with the democrats. they did withdraw their request in t
-time care. pokes in this country are committed to education and educating their children. the last thing they want to go is child care. but they're going to more part-time care. that creates a different view to our franchise owners and how they hire people and hours that they can provide to staff that they're limiting. >> greg, am i wrong in saying that i would assume if you're in the bookkeeping business, this on a short-term basis has to be a good thing? >> it actually is a great thing. yeah, we hit the market in two different areas. one, we obviously offer an opportunity for a group or individual to get into the business and start a career or wealth builder. but obviously, we have a touch with the end users, the 30 plus million around the u.s. and soon to be canada, as well. and supplying that small business owner with not only a bookkeeping service, but also data and analytics to help them run the business and make some business decisions as they grow. >> now, you're a franchise model. if, for example, whether it's dividends or capital gains and that goes up, does that change the gam
education in green is just a small chunk of what we spend money on. and the defense is a large chunk as well. i have to ask you, senator durbin, because you have said, even in a grand bargain, that we shouldn't be tackling entitlements. how you can be serious about deficit reduction if you're not willing to take on medicare? >> norah, i tackled them with simpson-bowles. we need to taxle them again. what i said in the last few hours of the fiscal cliff don't make program policy changes in medicare that you're going to live with decades reflect on this. yesterday 10,000 americans reached the age of 65, today another 10,000, tomorrow another 10,000, and every day for the next 18 years. these people have pied in to fair lifetime into an insurance program called social security and medicare and they are expecting the benefits they paid for. we have to resolve, as tom said, how are we going to come to grips with the growing health care costs in medicare and medicaid and still keep our promise to these people? so, yes, we need entitlement reform. let's do it in a calm, thoughtful way using somethin
, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >>> they are deadly weapons of war no one expects to see on the streets of an american city so you can imagine the shock when a gun buyback program in los angeles yielded rocket-propelled grenade launchers. kyung lah, what are you finding out about this story? >> police are saying it's certainly stunning but they are not surprised. this is something that they deal with every day. weapons on the streets of los angeles, certainly very rare that they come across something like this but they are hoping that by showing it it gives americans some pause and perspective. a rocket launcher. not just one but two handed over to police in this week's gun buyback day. shocking? not to police who have seen it before. among the roughly 10,000 citizens since 2009. >> we look like we're in a third world war nation when you see all of these weapons and the question you have to ask is why? >> these were u.s.-made and owned privately a
cnn's 2009 hero of year for bringing education it to mani manila's street children through mobile push cart classrooms. he hopes to be an inspiration it to others. >> i'm representing the street children to give them hope. >> he's one special boy. you may remember one of the 2011 nominees for the children's peace prize, malala yousufzai for supporting educational rights. she's still recovering from that attack in a british hospital. >>> his film bringing the santa claus, the sandeman and easter bunny to life on the big screen. we're talk to the director of "the rise of the guardians." when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. [ "the odd couple" theme playing ] humans. even when we cross our "t"s and dot our "i"s, we still run into problems -- mainly other humans. at liberty mutual insurance, we understand. that's why our auto p
not only deserve but have a right to an education. >> i would get my education if it is in home, school, or any place. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck, and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis, and all around the world malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today, she is recovering in england. number one, president barack obama. >> tonight you voted for action. not politics as usual. >> after a long, and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election. in 2012, the president also won the supreme court stamp of approval for his health care reform program, and made history with this statement. >> i think same sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with the community, shocked by senseless violence. >> these tragedies must end. and to end them we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn, atlanta. >>> well, to see the entire list or read more about the winners you chose, check out cnn.com. >>> it is a christmas ad first in britain. f
a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home, school or anyplace. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged even hardened pakistanis and all around the world, malala quickly became a symbol of good against evil. today she's recovering in england. number one. president obama. >> tonight you voted for action, not politics as usual. >> after a long and we mean long and bitter campaign, president obama won re-election. in 2012, the president also won the supreme court stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a
after she was assassinated. he spoke at a rally with his father. the president said his son's education is finished and his training has begun. two-time prime minister benazir bhutto was killed at a campaign rally in 2007. >>> and it's not all doom and gloom for the u.s. economy. home sales moved at the fastest pace in more than two years. sales rose more than 4.5%. sale were in-flighted by a temporary tax credit for home buyers. and investing more than $773 million in the manufacturing plants in michigan, the. says it will update and he can pand production lines at six plants in the state and creating more than 2,000 hourly jobs. it's all part of a deal that ford made to invest more than $6 billion in u.s. plants by the year 2015. >>> and a mother who hoped to spend christmas with her husband and two children turned to the online community for help. she was facing mountain bills and a major surgery. our affiliate wftx has her story. >> in this four-minute youtube video, jennifer johnson doesn't say a word but yet says so much as she tells the story of her heart condition that would kil
the congressional hearings and the stuff about the educational stuff, all the policy-making situations. thatnk it's a great thing washington d.c. has all these things and c-span covers it. >> eric want to c-span on comcast. created by america's cable companies in 1979, run to you as a public-service by your television provider. >> "washington journal" continues. host: randal o'toole is a senior fellow at the cato institute in washington and is the author of this book on how government undermines the dream of home ownership. thanks for being with us. >> good morning. glad to be here. host: how does the government affect homeowners buying a home? guest: 45% of american housing is in states and urban areas that have severe land-use restrictions, urban growth boundaries to prevent urban sprawl. they have other kinds of restrictions such as onerous permitting processes that it takes up to five years to get a permit to build up to one house. that makes it very hard for builders to meet demand for housing. when that happens, housing prices become very expensive. homeownership rates dropped. the federal
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
. and they're not addressing the real problems of america, which are jobs, productivity, education, science research, and withering infrastructure. this is appalling, and the american people should watch whatever's happening with a sense of disgust. >> you feel clearly very strongly. >> yes. >> why do you think we've got to this stage? what could turn it into a more positive narrative? >> i think we are at this place because the role of muddle in politics has overwhelmed, the lobbying process has overwhelmed the sound financial planning for the american people. we have a mess in the health care spending in the out years, which is real. but the costs of providing medical care through pharmaceutical monopolies, insurance monopolies and hospitalization monopolies means american people pays more than double what the rest of the people pay in the world. we're not fixing that. >> diana, is that your assessment of what we witnessed today? >> we are not making real attempts to cut spending, which is the problem. we have $16 trillion in debt. $1 trillion deficit. and what we're talking about today i
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
this at schools. i think local education decisions are best made at the local level. >> so even the -- people who should be the biggest supporters of this ideas to not only put armed police officers in schools, but to fund it republicans in congress, they are hands off, what does that tell you? >> lots of ways we can approach these issues and it really requires a multidisciplinary approach. what works in an environment in new york city isn't going to work in rural america, and there are 6,000 or 7,000 school districts in this country. one size doesn't fit all solutions are pretty clear. there are many things we can do, we can do now. let's not let those things that divide us, prevent us from moving forward in the things we're on agreement on now. >> let's keep talking, though, about what the nra does want to do right now, which is put armed police officers in schools. you know, there was an armed deputy assigned to columbine in and around the time of that massacre. his name was neil gardner, and he was monitoring students just offcampus when the students started shooting. he was one of the first
the beginning, educating his own political party as well as the american people at how devastating these cuts would be if sequestration hits. let's face t it's going to hit. >> you were talking about the paychecks and the immediate effect. i know that sometimes former generals are called upon to visit the basis. my dad's a former colonel and he'll do this to lift up the morale. what would you be telling those young soldiers who are putting their lives on the line while this battle is going on in washington? it's got to be attracting for them. >> well, i think our leaders are doing that. they're talking to the troops and -- because while we're in the football season, people are preoccupied. our troops aren't immune to what is going on in the country and they pay attention. our leaders would tell them, look, our leaders will come to their senses eventually. they're probably holding out with optimism. let me just say this to be frank, the -- while sequestration will hit, it will not be a cliff. it will be a slope. secretary pan anytime -- panetta and the chiefs will try to slow down this thing s
and leadership development, career and education amal development, thears, health and life skills, as well as sports, fitness and recreation. at then of the day, we are on a mission to impact. we want to make sure that every kid that goes through our door, graduates from high school with a plan so thea can be productive citizens, live healthy lifestyles and make great choices, whether that's trade school, military, degree, we are doing the best we can to stay relevant and serve the kissed, as our country, as you know, america's kids near crisis, somewhat. there are over 15 million kids between the ages of 4 and 16, but between the hours of 3:00 to 7:00 p.m. who go home unsupervised. one in three children don't graduate from high school in time. one out of three kids -- either is obese or unhealthy. so we are trying to leverage all the things we do and make a difference in those kids' lives and create a great future for kids like this. >> shannon: we know you have been doing this for nearly 150 years. keep up the great work. >> yeah. >> shannon: we will let folks know how to get involved, s
's a mistake. we're going to educate them this morning. let's start with the difference between sparkling and champagne. there's a big difference. >> there is a difference. so for a bubbly wine to be called champagne, that needs to come from the champagne region of france. so for instance, this chandon is a napa valley sparkling wine. not only does it talk about the differences where the grapes are grown, but the number of years that bottles have been aged and the different process to make the sham page and different grapes used. >> dave: you don't have to have a spam pain. a sparkling is just fine. that one $22. >> it's a great option for this new year's eve, depending on what kind of party you're going to or what kind of celebration you're having. there is something for everybody. >> dave: probably the most recognizable is the moet imperial. you always see this, why? >> it's the most loved sham page. at $40, it's a great value. it really says celebration and it's the perfect champagne for a night like tonight. >> dave: if you want to class it up, i know alisyn tends to lean volunteered
on friday at 5:30 p.m. eastern. if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class at money in motion.cnbc.com. >> an article in today's "new york times" finds once traditional dating priorities like having a good job, physical chemistry, may not matter if your credit score is less than attractive. the "times" interviewed more than 50 daters all around the u.s. they were all under 40 years old. brings us to this morning's squawk on the tweet. what's the most important financial question to ask on a first date. tweet us @squawk street. are we getting any responses? >> i don't know. can you imagine opening up that conversation? so, what's your credit score? are you using experian or transunion? >> i would expect you to do that on a date. >> what? why would you select me? i feel like that's not a compliment. >> this is a question you ask when you're over 40. the responders in that were all under 40. >> that's true. more to do with maybe a nest egg, so to speak, right? >> you can be more reckless. >> oh, yeah. >> london, here we come. >> retailers feeling the effect of slow holi
't have is anything like an educational system that will make it possible for people in their 50s, 60s and even 70s to remain employed because they're not going to have access to the skills they're going to need. yet another problem on the policy list. >> is your point here that public service used to be a job and people treated it as a job as opposed to a vanity project where you can spout off, or is that not your point? >> no, the point was that, you know, gerry ford was part of a generation who knew what it meant, you know, you work, your put your time in, there's going to be something there for you at the end of the day. it was guaranteed. you didn't worry about it. and now -- >> and the fact that public employees still have fixed pensions is the thing, i think -- the single thing that distinguishes them from so many private sector places which has added to this mistrust of these too generous public employee pension things that the rest of us who no longer have fixed pensions feel toward the retired civil servants, the retired cop, the retired whomever who gets his or her, you know
and investing in infrastructure and education. >> they are in recess until noon tomorrow. january 1st. then they will come back. we do expect according to dana bash our correspondent there, there will be a vote in the senate on the senate floor some time tonight. looking ahead to tomorrow, what advice do you have for republican house members who will consider -- assuming it passes the senate tonight -- what's your advice for them tomorrow? >> this is the beginning of the game. take the 84% of your winnings off the table. we spent 12 years getting the democrats to seed those tax cuts to the american people. take them off the table. then we go back and argue about making the tax cuts permanent for everyone. and we engage in a four-year, three yards and a cloud of dust fight to cut spending every day using the tools of the debt ceiling power and the fact that they have to come and ask the house and the senate for money every month or so. that's where we'll have to have a continuing fight. this is not easy. >> wolf -- >> let me -- i'll let you respond. but if it passes the senate tonight,
hearing the screaming and shooting over the school's loud speakers. it also says the board of education failed to provide a safe school setting or emergency response plan. in all, 26 people, including 20 children were shot and killed by gunman adam lanza that day. russia playing politics. putting their kids at risk. their orphans at risk. president vladimir putin has banned americans from adopting russian children. the move reportedly is in response to human rights violations handed down by president obama earlier this year -- earlier this month rather. putin's new law destroying the dreams of many american families currently in the process of adopting, including this. >> they were already our family. we already had their names. we were already decorating their room. it's really. [crying] >> are you crying? it? >> is so disturbing, this story. 1,000 russian children were adopted by americans last year. children are disabled. not wanted by anybody else in russia. living in orphanages. not available for adoption. a the love these families have gotten really close to the adoption. set ever
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